TSB launches investigation into the accident involving a Cessna Citation north of Kelowna, British Columbia; What is known so far

Richmond, British Columbia -The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) began the Field Phase of its investigation (A16P0186) into the 13 October 2016 accident north of Kelowna, British Columbia involving a Cessna Citation aircraft. The TSB offers its condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones in this accident.


What we know

  • A Cessna Citation departed Kelowna, British Columbia (CYLW) at 21:32 (Pacific Daylight Time), destined for Calgary/Springbank Airport, (CYBW).
  • The aircraft struck terrain approximately 11 km north of Kelowna Airport at approximately 21:40 local time (Pacific Daylight Time).
  • At this time we believe there was one pilot and 3 passengers on board, all of whom sustained fatal injuries.
  • The aircraft was not equipped with, nor was it required to carry, a Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) or a Flight Data Recorder (FDR); however, the team will be reviewing any electronic components on the aircraft from which hey can retrieve data to help understand the flight profile.
  • The air‎craft was destroyed from high deceleration forces after a vertical descent.
  • There were no emergency or distress calls made. No emergency locator transmitter signal was received.

Work to date

The occurrence site is currently under the control of the BC Coroners Service. The TSB has been granted access to the site. There are currently 5 investigators on site.

The RCMP is providing an unmanned aerial vehicle for site survey and documentation. This data will be provided to the BC Coroners Service and to the TSB.

So far, the team has:

  • examined the site (preliminary walk-around)
  • taken photographs of the wreckage
  • been collaborating with the BC Coroners Service
  • given Observer status to Transport Canada, the aircraft manufacturer, and the RCMP.
  • The team will continue taking measurements and documenting the site into the evening.

Next steps

In the coming days, the team will also:

  • Examine, document and photograph the aircraft wreckage
  • Make arrangements to transfer relevant aircraft components to the TSB Laboratory in Ottawa for further analysis
  • Examine the occurrence site and surrounding terrain features
  • Gather additional information about weather conditions
  • Gather information on Air Traffic communications and radar information
  • Obtain aircraft maintenance records and pilot records
  • Interview witnesses and next-of-kin
  • Review operational policies
  • Examine the regulatory requirements
  • Communication of safety deficiencies

Investigations are complex and we take the time needed to complete a thorough investigation. However, should the investigation team uncover safety deficiencies that present an immediate risk, the Board will communicate them without delay.

Further, it is important not to draw conclusions or speculate as to causes at this time. There are often many factors that can contribute to an accident.

Additional updates will be provided as required.

The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB)