Lethbridge Police officer thankful for support during physical challenge

Lethbridge, Alberta – Lethbridge Police Const. Terry Fieguth is overwhelmed by the support shown by the community in his efforts to bring mental health into the spotlight.

The K9 handler and fitness aficionado challenged himself to attempt as many pull-ups as possible over a 24-hour span to raise awareness and funds for mental health supports for First Responders. In doing so, Fieguth surpassed all the goals he’d set for himself.

“I’m very happy with the ways things turned out, and believe we truly got out there a lot of awareness and support to everybody that may be struggling,” he said.

As the clock ticked down on the challenge on Sunday, Oct. 10, 2021­­­ — World Mental Health Day — Fieguth’s goal of raising $2,000 for Legacy Place Society had been obliterated. More than $8,000 has already been raised for the non-profit society, which provides mental health support for First Responders. Donations will still be accepted through Oct. 17 at https://www.facebook.com/donate/220297013361459/

Fieguth was thankful not only for the generosity shown by the community, but the words of encouragement he received from not only friends, family and co-workers, but also strangers.

“I’ve had people I’d never met in my life reach out through social media and cheer me on, which was pretty cool to see. Just seeing that the message is reaching a huge variety of people, was very cool,” he said, adding he was especially grateful to hear testimonials from First Responders who had benefitted from the Legacy Place Society. He also wanted to give a “huge shout-out” to his wife, Tianna.

Lethbridge Police Const. Terry Fieguth is overwhelmed by the support shown by the community in his efforts to bring mental health into the spotlight.
Lethbridge Police Const. Terry Fieguth is overwhelmed by the support shown by the community in his efforts to bring mental health into the spotlight.

“She was with me, side-by-side the entire time. I couldn’t have done what I did without her,” said Fieguth.

As for the number of pull-ups, he’d set his eye on the mark of 4,030 set by David Goggins, a former Navy Seal considered one of the toughest men alive. His goal was to “at least be on the same playing field” as the man who inspires him, and Fieguth surpassed that goal with 4,080 pull-ups.

Fieguth set a game plan of doing 100 pull-ups every 10 minutes, with five minute breaks between. He began 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 with designs on powering through until the same time the next morning. It was around 2 a.m., however, when his hands finally gave up, his shoulder gave in and he was forced to end the challenge.

“Obviously I would have loved to keep going and pushed through for the entire 24 hours, but the body, it said it finally had enough,” said Fieguth, noting part of being mentally strong is knowing one’s limits. “I’m proud I was able to recognize, ‘is a long-term injury worth more than what’s at stake?’ ”

Upon ending the challenge, he rewarded himself with a big bowl of cereal. Fieguth isn’t ruling out further challenges in the future ­– he ran to raise money for Special Olympics earlier – but his immediate plans were to take a few days off to allow his body time to heal.

“At this point, definitely just rest and relaxation. But I’m sure something is going to spark me in the near future and on a whim I’ll probably try and raise some awareness and some funds for some other group as well,” he said.

For more information on Legacy Place Society, go to https://legacyplacesociety.com/

Lethbridge Police Service



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